WBCN and The American Revolution

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Runtime: 120 min

NR / 2018


The Jean Cocteau Cinema presents “WBCN and The American Revolution.”

Rent and screen this award-winning documentary and help support the Jean Cocteau Cinema at this critical time! The film is available for online rental and screening for $10.00 for a three-day rental.

“WBCN and The American Revolution” is the new, landmark rock ‘n roll documentary that tells the incredible, true story of the early days of the radical, underground radio station, WBCN-FM. The inspiring film is set against the dazzling and profound social, political, and cultural changes that took place in Boston and nationally during the late-1960s and early-70s, and is filled with rare and original archival audio and video. Produced and directed by Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Bill Lichtenstein.

As we unite to support one another during the COVID-19 crisis, 50% of the proceeds from the screening of this exclusive digital release will support us at the Jean Cocteau Cinema.

WHAT CRITICS ARE SAYING:

“I watched the movie with awe . . .” — Ty Burr, Boston Sunday Globe

“A fascinating doc . . . Timely as all hell.” — Jared Rasic, Source Weekly, Bend, Oregon

“Often raucous and merry . . . a loving profile.” — Tom Meek, Cambridge Day

“Lichtenstein’s film captures the station’s rollicking spirit and free-form style. . . “ 

— Peter Keough, Boston Globe

“WBCN and The American Revolution cements the radio station’s place in music history.” 

-– Jim Sullivan, WBUR, Boston

“Stunning…” — Chris Faraone, Dig Boston

“It’s been killing on the festival circuit….” — Alene Bouranova, Boston Magazine

“Before commercialism, consultants, and greed sucked the soul out of original free-form underground rock radio, a small band of young heroes, women and men, black and white, straight and gay, passionate, political, funny as fuck, fearless and revolutionary, used the airwaves to expose the music and the ideas that shaped how every college kid thought, felt and acted for the rest of our lives.” — Rob Barnett, former CBS Radio President of Programming, and VH1 VP of Programming